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VACList DigestVACList-Digest       Saturday, June 8, 2002      Issue 328
  
Today's Topics:
  
        1. water system
        2. Hydrogen hazards
        3. Re: Hydrogen hazards
        4. Re: Front Window Protector
        5. Re: Front Window Protector
        6. Re: Advice please - Travels, Flags, Fuel and Caravans
        7. Re: Front Window Protector
        8. Re: Front Window Protector
        9. Re: Front Window Protector
       10. Re: Location of bypass valve..
       11. Re: water system




----------------------------------------------------------------------




Message Number: 1
Date: Fri, 07 Jun 2002 20:25:28 -0500
From: Dick and Kris Parins <dkparins@ez-net.com>
Subject: water system



Charlie wrote:
 Most systems these days have both a gravity fill (aluminum fill tube) and a
city
 water connection. The city water hooks in on the pressure side of the pump
which
 does not allow water to back flow through it. Early Airstream demand
systems 
 and
 more and more newer coaches have a valve that can be used to bypass the
pump 
 and
 allow city water to back flow into the tank



Thanks for the info Charlie, that is most helpful.  I still wonder about a
vent.  It seems to me that either way the system must have a vent to
eliminate the vacuum as the pump takes water out of the tank.  Is there some
kind of valve that lets air in but not bugs?  Will it also let air (and/or
water) out if a trailer is set up with the bypass instead of the fill tube?
I will probably use the original fill tube if I can fit it to a tank but I
would not want to leave the cap off to break the vacuum.  Obviously this
wasn't a problem with the air pump system.

Dick
'62 Bambi



------------------------------

Message Number: 2
Date: Fri, 07 Jun 2002 23:29:08 -0400
From: Terry Tyler <tylerbears@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Hydrogen hazards

Gracias Senor,

I like a simple "work around" for a "maybe" problem, especially when the
cost is peanuts and the installation is ho hum.

Terry

mailto:tylerbears@xxxxxxxxxx.net

+++++++++++++++++++++++

on 06/07/02 9:41 AM, fitzjo1@xxxxxxxxxx.com wrote:

> I'm not sure where I stand as far as my own personal
> concern about hydrogen build-up while charging a
> battery.  But, FWIW, here's an idea:
> 
> Why don't you use forced ventilation?  This is what's
> done on engine compartments in ships to avoid the
> buildup of explosive gases.
> 
> A tiny DC fan can be bought from an electronics
> vendor.  These little guys use less than 0.1 amps.
> Obviously, they don't build much pressure, either.
> But, you could use flexible conduit with bulkhead
> fittings on the battery case or even PVC pipe.  Less
> than 1 CFM is more than enough to take care of this
> problem.
> 
> Since hydrogen is lighter than air, put the exhaust
> higher than the input.  And naturally, the system
> should be positive pressure so that you aren't pulling
> the exhaust gases past a tiny spark-making machine.
> 
> If you're solar, you can run the fan off the solar
> directly.  This ensures that the fan only runs when
> the panels are charging.  Thus, there's no discharge
> of battery power by the fan when it isn't needed.
> 
> Jon in SC
> 68 Overlander
> I can feel the drafts from my battery compartment!
> 
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup
> http://fifaworldcup.yahoo.com



------------------------------

Message Number: 3
Date: Sat, 08 Jun 2002 03:50:01 +0000
From: "Frank M. 'Mitch' Hill" <fmhill@xxxxxxxxxx.org>
Subject: Re: Hydrogen hazards

At 23:29 06/07/2002 -0400, you wrote:
> > A tiny DC fan can be bought from an electronics
> > vendor.
  . .


Better yet, look around for a junk Personal Computer or PC power supply, 
most have at least one 12VDC 3 1/8" fan in them.


Mitch Hill - K1FH / AFA1HN
64 AS Ambassador I'ntl
WBCCI #21960



------------------------------

Message Number: 4
Date: Sat, 8 Jun 2002 11:33:40 -0500
From: "Kevin D. Allen" <kallen@xxxxxxxxxx.k12.il.us>
Subject: Re: Front Window Protector

Greetings Shawn!


> It didn't come with the front window protector/awning that I've seen in
many
> photos and I was wondering if these are still available or will I have to
> look for a used one?  There doesn't appear to be any hardware on the
window
> to accommodate one.

Are you sure that you really want the front window cover?  There are a
number on the list including myself who have early 1960's trailers and do
not have the window protection cover.  If you are towing with a pickup or
other SUV type vehicle, there is a great side benefit to not having the
cover installed - - you can leave the front and rear drapes open in the
trailer (interior accordian doors as well) - - you now have a direct line of
site from your tow vehicles interior rear view mirror out the rear window of
your Airstream.  I have towed my '64 Overlander for the past 8 years without
problem, and find it very reassuring to know if (when) someone is tailgating
my trailer - - it is also a tremendous help when backing the trailer into a
tight spot for Freewheelers.

My trailer has never had a cover on the front window, and yes, it has been
broken three times that I know of. It has only been broken once in the past
8 years, and its replacement was Lexan which still looks new even though it
is now nearly 7 years old.  With the flat glass on the pre-Corning coaches,
I would consider my other options before jumping into the purchase of one of
the rock guards.

Good luck with your decision!
>
> Regards,
>
> Shawn Clarry
> '63 Safari
>

Kevin D. Allen
WBCCI/VAC #6359
1964 Overlander International/1999 GMC K2500 Suburban



------------------------------

Message Number: 5
Date: Sat, 8 Jun 2002 10:14:58 -0700
From: "My Airstream" <myairstream@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: Front Window Protector

From: "Kevin D. Allen" <kallen@xxxxxxxxxx.k12.il.us
> Greetings Shawn!
> Are you sure that you really want the front window cover?  There are a
> number on the list including myself who have early 1960's trailers and do
> not have the window protection cover.  If you are towing with a pickup or
> other SUV type vehicle, there is a great side benefit to not having the
> cover installed - - you can leave the front and rear drapes open in the
> trailer (interior accordian doors as well) - - you now have a direct line
of
> site from your tow vehicles interior rear view mirror out the rear window
of
> your Airstream.

I have a different opinion !  The front window cover was designed  to
protect the vital (and expensive to replace) front window from being
shattered by a kick back from the puller's rear wheel.  This is no small
problem.  Notice that larger RV's that pull vehicles have extensive skirts
to block rocks.  My PU was towed for a while and the front end is pock
marked with hundreds of rock pits.

The basic structure of a window cover is not hard to duplicate.  A piano
hinge at top, aluminum angle "iron" for frame and some really tough
corrugated roofing material, two hinged arm with a locking nut and 2
fastening plates.  These items exist on many types of travel trailers and
can be found in scrap.

As to peering through your rear view mirror and sighting traffic from
behind,  I would caution you not to divide your attention for such a precise
task.  It only takes a fraction of a second of distraction to cause disaster
at highway speed.  I learned this when I rolled my 66 Ford puller in the
Baja.  Concentrating on what's ahead is job one.  Sighting through three
windows and one mirror seems dangerous to me.  As to backing, the width of
the Airstream makes sighting the sides easy . . . just go slow and follow
Wally's time honored backing technique as spelled out in your owners
handbook.  Peering through the windows with your center rear view mirror
won't help.

One last thing.  If your face your tongue into inclement weather the window
cover is the best awning you've got.

Bob Kiger  http://cruiserbob.com
66 Airstream Safari
Mira Mar Mobile Park
Oceanside, CA




------------------------------

Message Number: 6
Date: Sat, 8 Jun 2002 12:19:51 -0500
From: "Kevin D. Allen" <kallen@xxxxxxxxxx.k12.il.us>
Subject: Re: Advice please - Travels, Flags, Fuel and Caravans

Greetings Nick and Jackie!


> After 18 months of planning and dreaming, I am finally on my way to the
states in July from the UK to pick up and use my 69 Overlander.
> I am using a  tonne suburban to tow and will be travelling between Albany
New York, and Spokane Washington to pick it up. Once the long haul is over I
plan to take it easy around say a 300 mile radius
> of Albany for two weeks, before a reluctant return to the work in the UK.
>
> I have been in the States only twice before on short trips only and
without an Airstream! It would be great to get some advice on where to stay
on both the trip out to Spokane with just the suburban.

I can't be much help east of Ohio, but once you get to points Ohio and west;
Super 8 Motels provide nice clean rooms for a reasonable cost and most offer
"Continental Breakfast" as a part of their packages.  They have a "VIP" club
that provides discounts on nightly stays.  In addition, they have a web site
as follows:

http://www.super8.com/Super8/control/home

When I am traveling without my Airstream this is my first-choice chain.  The
typical rate during the week at most of the locations with which I have had
expereince runs from $35.00 to $65.00.  They also have a printed catalog of
locations with greater details about ameneties offered that is available via
regular "snail" mail.

> And also where we can stay for the night when on the way back with the
Airstream.  It is business like trip, as my young family will be awaiting my
> return.  I will have a mechanic with me, courtesy of his desire to hit the
road, and a very helpful relative back in Albany.

While you haven't asked about routes, I am assuming that you will likely
follow Interstate 90 much of the time.  If you are uncomfortable with heavy
city traffic, I might suggest avoiding Chicago, IL and Madison, WI - -
especially with the trailer in tow as some drivers in both cities can be a
bit unforgiving of strangers piloting RVs.  (My hometown is Chicago, and I
lived a short distance from Madison for more than 7 years.)

I have made several trips between northern Illinois and Cleveland, OH
recently and have discovered a route that avoids both cities and adds less
than an hour of travel time.  I have been exiting the Ohio Turnpike and
taking US 6 West to US 24 West and following US 24 West to Interstate 74
West at Peoria, Illinois.  Interstate 74 West merges with Interstate 80 West
at Bettendorf, Iowa.  From Interestate 80, there are a number of northbound
Interstates that will take you back to Interstate 90.  <A route that offers
a change of pace would be to take US 61 North from I-80 at Davenport, Iowa
(good 4-lane highway) - - to Dubuque, Iowa where you could take US 20 West
(good 4-lane highway) to Interstate 35 North (near Cedar Falls, IA) - - or
if you are feeling adventuresome continue on US 61 North (mostly improved
two-lane) all the way back to Interstate 90.

> Some advice on places to stay once I get back to Albany and travel with my
family would be great.
>
> Also I have seen flagstaffs placed at the rear or front of Airstreams and
would like to get two or three of these - the stars and stripes, the union
jack, and an Airstream flag. I also have
> an idea that it would be great to fly smaller flags on the wings or front
bumper or as you folks say fender of the suburban as you sometimes see
> on limos.  Can anyone offer advice on where to get
> these.

There are a number of sources for these poles and holders that you mention.
One of the more commonly cited sources is:

POLE EASE, 9751 Rexford Rd., Jackson, MI 49201, Ph. 517-536-8022.

They sell a one, two, or three pole holder that attaches to the tongue jack
tube.  They also sell 3-piece telescoping flagpoles that really create a
nice package.  You can find out more about these at:

http://www.wbcci.org/html/classifieds.html

I have had a 3-pole set on my Overlander since 1998, and am thoroughly
satisfied with both the holder and poles.

The small scale holders that you mention are often seen in a vendor's booth
at International Rallies.  The 3, 4, and 6 flag holders that I have came
from a company in Florida that sold flags of all sizes representing all
states, provinces, and countries.  They were located in Florida, but I will
have to do a little searching to find their contact information.

> Can anyone offer advice on fuel consumption for the burb, I am figuring on
10 miles per gallon as an average with or without the airstream in tow; is
this about right - My trip each way is 2700 miles!

You are probably in "the ballpark" as they say.  Much will depend upon how
the Suburban is equipped and its year of manufacture.  My tow vehicle is a
1999 GMC K2500 Suburban with 7.4 liter V8 and heavy duty Overdrive Automatic
with 4.10 differentials.  My towing average with my 1964 Overlander is 12
MPG overall with 10 in the mountains and as much as 14 MPG on flat
Interstates.  <I rarely tow at more than 60 MPH and generally hold to a
maximum of 55 MPH when towing.  I also use the Overdrive gear at least 90%
of the time shifting to normal drive if the transmission begins to hunt.>
Its solo fuel milage ranges from 12 to 15 MPG.  I always use premium
unleaded fuel and my mechanic has chosen specific sparkplugs and adjusted
the timing to reflect this fuel usage.  If your Suburban has the 5.7 liter
V8, you solo milage may be a little higher - - but your towing milage will
likely be a bit less.
>
> It looks as if I will miss the rallies this year, but I will be back in
2003 and we aim to go then.

>
> One more thing - International Caravans - in around 2010 or 2015 my wife
and I will be ready to travel the world with our Airstream, does anyone have
plans to re-create the caravans of the 50s and 60s. I
> imagine a group of 10 or 20 of us, with sponsership, making our way around
the world.
>
> All the best and regards
>
> Nick & Jackie
>
Good luck with your trip!

Kevin D. Allen
WBCCI/VAC #6359
1964 Overlander International/1999 GMC K2500 Suburban




------------------------------

Message Number: 7
Date: Sat, 8 Jun 2002 10:32:10 -0700
From: "My Airstream" <myairstream@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: Front Window Protector

Shawn wrote:
> > It didn't come with the front window protector/awning that I've seen in
many
> > photos and I was wondering if these are still available or will I have
to
> > look for a used one?

Just after I finished my post on this thread I was watching "Next" on CNN.
They were showing a 61" Plasma monitor.  How about just blocking out the
window which will save you the cost of fabricating a window cover.  Then you
put this 61 Plasma monitor inside your coach and feed both computer and TV
signals to same.  You would be the envy of NASA and could take virtual
vacations eventually saving up the $25,000 needed to buy that puppy.  They
did mention that price was coming down :)

Bob Kiger  http://cruiserbob.com
66 Airstream Safari
Mira Mar Mobile Park
Oceanside, CA



------------------------------

Message Number: 8
Date: Sat, 8 Jun 2002 14:14:43 -0000
From: "Scott Scheuermann" <s.l.scheuermann@xxxxxxxxxx.att.net>
Subject: Re: Front Window Protector

Depending on what year trailer you are talking about the front window glass
can be next to nothing to replace, or very expensive. If you have a corning
window, by all means get a cover. If you have a flat piece of glass (pre
corning) it is a cheep and easy fix. I, like Kevin, find it VERY convienent
to be able to look into my rear view mirror and see through my trailer to
the traffic behind me. This has also allowed me to see when I forget to
latch the refrigerator door, so I can stop to take care of it before it is
destroyed!

In 43 years of being towed across country (I know my trailer's history) the
window has only broken once. It was not difficult nor expensive to replace.
If it breaks again I may consider lexan, but for now it is fine as it is.

Scott
1960 Overlander

----- Original Message -----
From: "My Airstream" <myairstream@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
To: "Multiple recipients of VACList" <VACList@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2002 5:14 PM
Subject: [VAC] Re: Front Window Protector


> From: "Kevin D. Allen" <kallen@xxxxxxxxxx.k12.il.us
> > Greetings Shawn!
> > Are you sure that you really want the front window cover?  There are a
> > number on the list including myself who have early 1960's trailers and
do
> > not have the window protection cover.  If you are towing with a pickup
or
> > other SUV type vehicle, there is a great side benefit to not having the
> > cover installed - - you can leave the front and rear drapes open in the
> > trailer (interior accordian doors as well) - - you now have a direct
line
> of
> > site from your tow vehicles interior rear view mirror out the rear
window
> of
> > your Airstream.
>
> I have a different opinion !  The front window cover was designed  to
> protect the vital (and expensive to replace) front window from being
> shattered by a kick back from the puller's rear wheel.  This is no small
> problem.  Notice that larger RV's that pull vehicles have extensive skirts
> to block rocks.  My PU was towed for a while and the front end is pock
> marked with hundreds of rock pits.
>
> The basic structure of a window cover is not hard to duplicate.  A piano
> hinge at top, aluminum angle "iron" for frame and some really tough
> corrugated roofing material, two hinged arm with a locking nut and 2
> fastening plates.  These items exist on many types of travel trailers and
> can be found in scrap.
>
> As to peering through your rear view mirror and sighting traffic from
> behind,  I would caution you not to divide your attention for such a
precise
> task.  It only takes a fraction of a second of distraction to cause
disaster
> at highway speed.  I learned this when I rolled my 66 Ford puller in the
> Baja.  Concentrating on what's ahead is job one.  Sighting through three
> windows and one mirror seems dangerous to me.  As to backing, the width of
> the Airstream makes sighting the sides easy . . . just go slow and follow
> Wally's time honored backing technique as spelled out in your owners
> handbook.  Peering through the windows with your center rear view mirror
> won't help.
>
> One last thing.  If your face your tongue into inclement weather the
window
> cover is the best awning you've got.
>
> Bob Kiger  http://cruiserbob.com
> 66 Airstream Safari
> Mira Mar Mobile Park
> Oceanside, CA
>
>
>
>
>
> To unsubscribe or change to a daily Digest format, please go to
> http://airstream.net/vaclist/listoffice.html
>
> When replying to a message, please delete all unnecessary original text
>
>



------------------------------

Message Number: 9
Date: Sat, 8 Jun 2002 12:55:50 -0700
From: "Gary Quamen" <g_quamen@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: Front Window Protector

> Depending on what year trailer you are talking about the front window
glass
> can be next to nothing to replace, or very expensive. If you have a
corning
> window, by all means get a cover. If you have a flat piece of glass (pre
> corning) it is a cheep and easy fix

Hey Scott:

Even if it is Corning ('66 thru '68) it is flat.  Both front and rear.  Only
the side ones are curved.

GQ '67 Safari



------------------------------

Message Number: 10
Date: Sat, 08 Jun 2002 16:03:39 -0600
From: Charlie/Betty Burke <cbburke@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: Location of bypass valve..

Jim,

The pump bypass valve has not been a feature of coaches for many, many years.
The last time I say one was in a late 50's coach. To this day, the only coaches
that Airstream puts a bypass valve in are their pusher motorhomes. They did
experiment in the early 90's in their motorhomes with an automatic fill valve
but that turned out to be more of a problem so they stopped. The valves you are
seeing are either low point drains or the water heater bypass valves.

Charlie

James Clark wrote:

> We have an 86 32' Excella with the "Island Queen Bed and a set of drawers
> under a microwave and 3 closet doors and a set of drawers  on the curbside
> of the trailer... there are some valves under the drawers next to the
> sink... Is that where I should find the bypass valve to put water in the
> tank from the "city water inlet"???   The system drains seem to be there...
>
> Jim
>
> To unsubscribe or change to a daily Digest format, please go to
> http://airstream.net/vaclist/listoffice.html
>
> When replying to a message, please delete all unnecessary original text
>
>



------------------------------

Message Number: 11
Date: Sat, 08 Jun 2002 16:10:29 -0600
From: Charlie/Betty Burke <cbburke@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: water system

Dick,

Often on older retrofits the top compressor inlet is converted to the vent line.
This is done by mounting a line from the vent to the wall with as much elevation
as possible above the tank to eliminate splash.

Charlie

Dick and Kris Parins wrote:

> Charlie wrote:
>  Most systems these days have both a gravity fill (aluminum fill tube) and a
> city
>  water connection. The city water hooks in on the pressure side of the pump
> which
>  does not allow water to back flow through it. Early Airstream demand
> systems
>  and
>  more and more newer coaches have a valve that can be used to bypass the
> pump
>  and
>  allow city water to back flow into the tank
>
> Thanks for the info Charlie, that is most helpful.  I still wonder about a
> vent.  It seems to me that either way the system must have a vent to
> eliminate the vacuum as the pump takes water out of the tank.  Is there some
> kind of valve that lets air in but not bugs?  Will it also let air (and/or
> water) out if a trailer is set up with the bypass instead of the fill tube?
> I will probably use the original fill tube if I can fit it to a tank but I
> would not want to leave the cap off to break the vacuum.  Obviously this
> wasn't a problem with the air pump system.
>
> Dick
> '62 Bambi
>
> To unsubscribe or change to a daily Digest format, please go to
> http://airstream.net/vaclist/listoffice.html
>
> When replying to a message, please delete all unnecessary original text
>
>



------------------------------


End of VACList-Digest  #328
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