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VAL Digest V1 #101



VAL Digest          Friday, December 19 2003          Volume 01 : Number 101




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Topics in Today's Digest:

Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks
[VAL] Historic Plates for Oregon Trailers
Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks
[VAL] Maurice Tierney Out of Office
Re: [VAL] Re: Silicone Removal
Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks
[VAL] Sew-in drapery tabs
Re: [VAL] Sew-in drapery tabs
Re: [VAL] RE: Shower curtain glides
[VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #90 - Nice clean potty tank
[VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #98 - Tow-er squatting
[VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #93 - Bike racks
[VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #98 - Hitch suitability
[VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #93 - Leaks, leaks, leaks
Re: [VAL] Sew-in drapery tabs
[VAL] Forwarded message
Re: [VAL] Re: Silicone Removal
Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks
[VAL] One for the Good Guys
Re: [VAL] One for the Good Guys
Re: [VAL] Sew-in drapery tabs
Re: [VAL] Forwarded message
Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks
Re: [VAL] Forwarded message
[VAL] RE: Shower curtain glides

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 22:03:59 -0800
From: Joann Wheatley <jwheatle@xxxxxxxxxx.edu>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks

One thing I did that probably wasn't too bright was to put the "bath" - 
porcelain potty - frig, hot water heater, sink & stove more or less in 
a line along the midsection on the street (left) side. There is a lot 
of storage on the opposite side so I'll have to remember to load it up 
with canned goods and pots to level it left to right. I did swap the 3" 
drop axle for a straight axle so I'm hoping the tail dragging is 
minimal but do plan to put a couple of skids on the back just in case.
    One of my problems de jeur is getting the dang silicon sealer out of 
the window frames where the PO went ape with the stuff. I bought some 
3M stuff that's supposed to remove it but it's really not that great - 
you still have to soak the sealer.
     Painted all the floor sections again today - hopefully that gives 
each piece and its edges 2 coats. I hope I didn't lose count anywhere. 
This has really been a challenge.
Jo Ann Wheatley
On 17, Dec 2003, at 8:30 PM, Kevin D Allen wrote:

> Greetings Jo Annn!
>
> The general placement of your fresh and waste tanks in the Bubble
> approximate that used by Airstream in my '78 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre.
> The water tank is under the front window (25 gallons), the black tank 
> is
> in the rear (9 gallons), the gray tank is in the rear street-side 
> corner
> (8 gallons).  The range/oven and furnace are over the axle on the
> curbside and the water heater is just to the rear of the axle on the
> street-side.  Actually the positioning of your gray tank is probably
> somewhat better for weight management than the rear corner where it is
> in my Minuet's original floorplan.  The tongue weight on my Minuet is
> 550 pounds with a gross weight of 3,100 pounds.
>
> I also always try to empty the wastewater tanks before traveling any
> great distance as the Minuet's ground clearance needs all of the help 
> it
> can get - - I am hoping that its new axle corrects most of its ground
> clearance issues.
>
> Kevin
>
> Kevin D. Allen
> 1964 Overlander International/1999 GMC K2500 Suburban
> 1978 Argosy Minuet
> 1975 Cadillac Convertible (towcar in-training)
> WBCCI/VAC #6359
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: valist-admin@xxxxxxxxxx.com
> [mailto:valist-admin@xxxxxxxxxx.com] On Behalf Of Joann Wheatley
> Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 7:58 PM
> To: valist@xxxxxxxxxx.com
> Subject: Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks
>
> Is there a general rule regarding say, a single axle trailer and weight
> distribution between tongue and axle? My grey tank had to be shirt to
> just behind the axle on the Bubble and the black is behind that as is
> the porcelain potty. The fresh water, bed, propane tank, 2 batteries,
> and frig are forward of the axle. I'm holding my breath that it works
> out about right - at least when I start out as the fresh tank will be
> full and the other two almost empty.
> Jo Ann
>
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 06:12:51 +0000
From: "Steve Lewis" <lewissteve@xxxxxxxxxx.com>
Subject: [VAL] Historic Plates for Oregon Trailers

I was finishing up at the DMV counter today when the nice lady behind
the counter (really!!!) noticed the new copy of the Vintage Advantage I
had been reading (looks great, by the way... nice job Brian!). She
asked if I had a trailer and I proceeded to tell her about my '56
Safari that'll be ready for the road by June (trailer gods and title
search engines willing) She asked if I had plates and I don't yet, then
pulled out a DMV notice that had a paragraph saying something about
permanent registration and special historic plates that will be
available starting Jan 1, 2004 for non-motorized vehicles. So, my
fellow Oregonian Vintage Trailerites without original plates, this
would be something to check out in the new year. I don't know what the
new plates will look like, but it's certainly worth looking into anyway.

Steve Lewis
'56 Safari

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Grab our best dial-up Internet access offer: 6 months @$9.95/month.  
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 22:11:53 -0800
From: Joann Wheatley <jwheatle@xxxxxxxxxx.edu>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks

Oh wait - I forgot about the 2 batteries, 7gal propane tank, and spare 
tire will be mounted on the tongue so that's a bunch of weight too. I 
was wondering also, has anyone tried one of the little "emergency" 
tires to limp along if need be? It sure would save weight and I'd be 
able to lift it and change a trailer tire if I had to whereas I don't 
think I can lift the full-size spare I have.
Jo Ann
On 17, Dec 2003, at 8:54 PM, Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer 
wrote:

> 10 to 15% on the tongue I read on this list today. You might need to
> load groceries forward as well as pots and pans...
>
> Gerald J.
> -- 
> Entire content copyright Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer.
> Reproduction by permission only.
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> When replying to a message. please delete all unnecessary original text
>
> To unsubscribe or change to a digest format, please go to
> http://www.tompatterson.com/VAC/VAList/listoffice.html

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 02:00:45 -0500
From: "publisher@xxxxxxxxxx.com" <publisher@xxxxxxxxxx.com>
Subject: [VAL] Maurice Tierney Out of Office

I will be out of the office from December 15th through December 31st. Thanks.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 08:39:37 -0700
From: Rob Davis <rob-iod@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Re: Silicone Removal

Permatex 'Gasket Remover' worked wonderfully for me (it's the ONLY 
product that did).

Rob Davis
'64 GT #1824


Joann Wheatley wrote:

> One of my problems de jeur is getting the dang silicon sealer out of 
> the window frames where the PO went ape with the stuff. I bought some 
> 3M stuff that's supposed to remove it but it's really not that great - 
> you still have to soak the sealer.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 10:08:05 -0600
From: "Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer" <geraldj@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks

If you can't lift the spare, how are you going to lift the flat? Unless
the flat has shredded the tire, its going to weigh within a fraction of
a pound of what the spare weighs. Air isn't very heavy...

Problems I can see with the tiny spare are: Finding a wheel with the
proper bolt centers and center hole; the very limited lifetime of that
tire, something like 50 miles; trailer loads often are considerably
higher per tire (hence the much higher air pressure) than car tire loads
so that little tire will last even less well, if it can even hold the
load up; The smaller wheel and tire will compromise ground clearance and
tilt the refrigerator.

Now convince me the little spare is a good idea. Read its load rating.

Gerald J.
- -- 
Entire content copyright Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer.
Reproduction by permission only.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 10:58:14 -0600
From: "Brian Jenkins" <jenkins1924@xxxxxxxxxx.com>
Subject: [VAL] Sew-in drapery tabs

Here are some sew-in tabs, tracks, etc:

http://www.beaconfabric.com/vindex.html

Look under Boat/RV Drapes.

Brian Jenkins
#7819

_________________________________________________________________
Enjoy the holiday season with great tips from MSN.  
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 11:34:52 -0600
From: "Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer" <geraldj@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Sew-in drapery tabs

http://www.beaconfabric.com worked better for me. No Javascript. The
tail slide shown at: http://www.beaconfabric.com/cat97.htm for 35 cents
in small quantities appears to be the one that fits my '68 Caravel
shower curtain track. Though I wish they'd show dimensions.

Gerald J.
- -- 
Entire content copyright Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer.
Reproduction by permission only.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:55:16 -0800
From: "Oliver Filippi" <ofilippi@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] RE: Shower curtain glides

Stephanie,

You might want to try James Ambruso the fellow in Florida who specializes in
Airstream drapes. He advertises in the Blue Beret.

He might sell you some.

Oliver Filippi

- ----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Stephanie Roberts" <stefrobrts@stephanies-mustang.com>
To: <valist@xxxxxxxxxx.com>
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 9:35 AM
Subject: [VAL] RE: Shower curtain glides


> Hi there! I haven't found the glides yet. Apparently sew-on-tabs are one
of

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 04:03:00 -0600
From: waymark1@xxxxxxxxxx.com
Subject: [VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #90 - Nice clean potty tank

Hi Erica,
There are some convenient accessories that allow you to wash your tank
out from outside without dragging a hose inside.
If it is a straight shot from the dump pipe into the tank, Valterra makes
an elbow for your dump hose that incorporates a washout hose fitting and
jet that aims a jet of water into the tank through the dump pipe and
valve. If there is an angle, their Master Blaster tank wand has a jet set
at a right angle that can be stuck up into the pipe to shoot water back
into the tank.
Don't forget the antifreeze if you leave those 2 bowls of water in the
tank over the winter, unless you live pretty far south.
Al
> ------------------------------
The back window screen comes out easily and we flush our tank with a hose
every time we dump.  It takes time but seems to be worth it.  Then we put
two bowls of water in the tank to keep it wet while it's being stored. 
The hose flush probably won't work for everyone.  ......
> Erica

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 01:43:15 -0600
From: waymark1@xxxxxxxxxx.com
Subject: [VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #98 - Tow-er squatting

Weight distribution is not specifically for keeping the rear of the tow
vehicle from squatting relative to the front of the tow vehicle, though
it does do that. The purpose of WD is to distribute the tongue (and tow
vehicle cargo) load as evenly as practical among the front and rear axles
of the tow vehicle and the trailer axles.
I figured that with a 700# tongue (and cargo) load and no WD, the rear
axle loading of my Chevy Express would increase by 953# and the load on
its front wheels would decrease by 253#. With perfectly adjusted WD the
load would be spread among the three sets of wheels by 233# on each. Of
course to get perfect adjustment would require screws on the hookups,
like on a Blue Ox WD spring, instead of using the chain links for
adjustment. We can get pretty close with chain links, though.
With the 1-ton long wheelbase van and no WD the rear hardly squats at
all, only about 1/2", and the front of the van raises by an almost
unmeasurable amount, maybe 1/8".
A 1/2T or 3/4T Suburban would squat and rise more than a 1T vehicle,
especially with its greater rear overhang and shorter wheelbase.
Al
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 16:57:27 -0600
> From: Kevin D Allen <overlander64@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
> Subject: RE: [VAL] Re: Reese question
> 
> Greetings Patti!
> 
................................
> Neither of my trailers cause the Suburban to squat much more than 1.5
inches before the weight distribution bars are attached.
> The one thing that I might mention is that I utilize the Reese Dual Cam
sway control with both trailers and is a big part of my reason for paying
such close attention matching hitch weight to spring bars as it just
seems like the Dual Cam system works better with the closely matched
bars.
> 
> Kevin

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 03:15:00 -0600
From: waymark1@xxxxxxxxxx.com
Subject: [VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #93 - Bike racks

It's a long way up there when you have a full size Chevy van. The bikes
would stick up higher than the trailer's A/C.
If I had a rooftop carrier then I'd have to find a place to keep the
ladder. Also I don't have 15# bikes - the Mondia is 23+# and the
Cannondale is 26+#. The Fuji knock-around bike is over 30# and who knows
how much the gas pipe (or maybe solid bars of iron?) huge Schwinn weighs
(grunt!). The lightest bike I ever had was the much lamented late Gitane
TdF that was 21# (squashed by a Dodge van).
I want to get an enclosed bike carrier to go on the back of the trailer
for lack of any better place. The front of the van is not a good place
for an enclosed carrier, as it would block the radiator and lights.
Al
Bike rider for 46+ years
> 
> My question is why would you want mount them way back there - where the
bikes will get all the dirt and junk that comes off the car and the
trailer, when you could carry them on top of your vehicle where they stay
fairly clean.  Buy a good Yakama or Thule rack - your bikes will be much
safer and happier.
> 
> Ken Johansen
> 5358
> Bike rider for 40+ years.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 01:13:03 -0600
From: waymark1@xxxxxxxxxx.com
Subject: [VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #98 - Hitch suitability

According to the Reese "Weight-Distributing Hitch Selector," the 1200 WD
Hitch is suitable for tongue + rear-of-tow vehicle cargo loads of
600-1200#.
If it is too bouncy anyway, you can get lighter leveling (spring) bars
from Reese for 400-800# or even 200-600#.
Having too stiff bars will put too much load on the trailer suspension
(and of course, frame) when you drive into dips like crossing gutters
going into gas stations.
Instead of spring bars what is really needed is a spring element with a
much lower spring rate so that the bar loading is more nearly constant,
like a gas spring (accumulator), no matter what the vertical angle
between the tow vehicle and the trailer. But of course that would be much
more expensive.
Al
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 16:57:55 -0500
> From: "Patricia V. Raimondo" <praimond@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
> Subject: [VAL] Re: Reese question
> 
> Got a question for those familiar with swing bar limitations. When my
Hensley crashed this summer I replaced it on my 03 Safari with a Reese
system. The bars are rated at 1,200 lb. class V. (also replaced the
square receiver on the back of the Suburban with a class V) It occured to
me that I could use the same bars and hitch with my 54 Flying Cloud by
just adding the clamps to the A frame. (I was only using a sway
controller towing the FC) BUT are the new bars too heavy for the FC? 
> 
> The Safari weighs in at 6,500 lbs. the FC only 2,600. It seemed like a
cool idea to have one system with a few extra parts that could be used
for both trailers. Same idea, I could add the ball to the side of the
Reese hitch, and the ball with plate to the Safari A frame and use the
sway controller with both trailers also. Have I lost you all?
>
> Patti

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 03:01:29 -0600
From: waymark1@xxxxxxxxxx.com
Subject: [VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #93 - Leaks, leaks, leaks

These things just aren't intended to last 30-40 years, are they?
If you get every last leak sealed and stopped, there's still all that
condensation running down the insides of the walls and soaking the
plywood floor.
My trailer was used for about 5 years then stored in indoor dry heated
storage for about 20 years. Now that we've been using it for about 8
months we're seeing water damage from condensation, plus the toilet
overflowed and soaked the carpet and pad in the bathroom. It's not inside
right now but I have a dehumidifier in it, running full time at the
driest setting. I plan soon to have a shed built for the trailer, and
keep the dehumidifier going.
Al
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 12:21:17 -0600
> From: "Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer" 
> <geraldj@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
> Subject: Re: [VAL] Re: VAL Digest V1 #92
> 
> Seams leak, all the way to the roof. Windows and doors leak at the
gaskets and around the frames. Seam leaks run down the insides of the
walls to the floor.
> 
> Leaking at the window hinges are particularly hard to stop. My dad gave
up and put a little aluminum awning over what is my now '68 Caravel. 
> You can see them on my web page at http://homepages.isunet.net/geraldj 
> 
> The original galvanized tank WILL leak, its just a question of when. 
> And when filled with cool water in a humid climate it will have
condensation (just like an uninsulated toilet flush tank) to add moisture
to rotting a floor. An insulation coating over that tank should slow that
condensation (and the warming of the water). I don't think it will take
much of an insulation layer...
> 
> Some water will get in through the refrigerator air inlet, more through
wear spots in the wheel wells.
> 
> A thin bead of vulkem or alumiseal at all laps of the exterior should
dry up the interior, if the windows don't leak at the hinges and the
window and door gaskets are good. Don't neglect the light fixture
openings, nor the radio and TV antenna penetrations.
> 
> Gerald J.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 21:02:39 -0500
From: Daisy Welch <jtdjtd@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Sew-in drapery tabs

I bought those, but the heads are too small for the track on my '73's 
shower....

Daisy

Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer wrote:

> http://www.beaconfabric.com worked better for me. No Javascript. The
> tail slide shown at: http://www.beaconfabric.com/cat97.htm for 35 cents
> in small quantities appears to be the one that fits my '68 Caravel
> shower curtain track. Though I wish they'd show dimensions.
> 
> Gerald J.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 21:16:13 -0600
From: "Tom Patterson" <tomp@xxxxxxxxxx.com>
Subject: [VAL] Forwarded message

Forwarded message.............

- -Tom

To: valist@xxxxxxxxxx.com,
Subject:   HELP
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 22:27:50 -0800
From: Pearl Main <pearlm@xxxxxxxxxx.net>


Dr. Gerald and  anyone else
Maybe I am wrong to feel somewhat responsible but  this has been
bothering me all afternoon.
My 1964   30' Soverign is for sale.....I am the original owner   and
today a young woman came to look at it and  made me an offer.    She
wants to use it for her home on wheels and since she is in the musical
field  does a lot of moving about for their
jobs and  would prefer to live in the A/S  instead of  motels.
I am afraid that she does not understand  what is needed for a tow
vehicle  and I am   not sure how  to go about giving her the info about
a tow vehicle....she mentioned somethiing about getting a older pick up
truck from a relative but what I need to know
to pass on the info is:    the tongue weight  of my trailer      What
kind of a tow vehicle is needed to tow it

I have been towing it with a 1 ton Ford  Econline van with an extended
body   with a Reese hitch with both  equalizer bars and
sway bars        I would feel guilty if  she had an accident by towing
with too light a truck

I have pampered this trailer for 39 years and always  kept all
maintenance up to snuff......always keeping it ready to take off with a
couple of hours notice so I hope whoever  owns it next  keeps it  for
many years of happy trailering.    I wish my health had not gone down
hill and  that I could continue.   I will appreciate any finfo forarded
to me   Pearl in SoCal

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 19:32:59 -0800
From: Joann Wheatley <jwheatle@xxxxxxxxxx.edu>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Re: Silicone Removal

Thanks Rob. Today I dipped a small steel "bristle" brush in the 3M 
product and went at it. Most of it's off so's I can put the new real 
window seal in. What what.
Jo Ann
On 18, Dec 2003, at 7:39 AM, Rob Davis wrote:

> Permatex 'Gasket Remover' worked wonderfully for me (it's the ONLY 
> product that did).
>
> Rob Davis
> '64 GT #1824
>
>
> Joann Wheatley wrote:
>
>> One of my problems de jeur is getting the dang silicon sealer out of 
>> the window frames where the PO went ape with the stuff. I bought some 
>> 3M stuff that's supposed to remove it but it's really not that great 
>> - you still have to soak the sealer.
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> When replying to a message. please delete all unnecessary original text
>
> To unsubscribe or change to a digest format, please go to
> http://www.tompatterson.com/VAC/VAList/listoffice.html

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 19:39:24 -0800
From: Joann Wheatley <jwheatle@xxxxxxxxxx.edu>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks

Thanks for considering this subject, Dr. G. If I were in a real pinch, 
here's my plan"
1. Try to canned sealant/air pressure in a can for "Big Truck" size - I 
carry at least 2 on each trip so far.
2. If that doesn't work, I'd try to call AAA or local tow folk.
3. If that doesn't work - now I'm really get desperate right? - well, 
then I'd try to change the tire and if I could get it jacked up, I'd 
leave that old spare like a bad habit - sitting on the side of the 
road, looking for a home.
4. If that all worked, with the little emergency tire hopefully holding 
up it's end, I'd very slowly limp into civilization and get to a 
very-dang-little-service station where I'd call a tire dealer.
5. I go inside the trailer and make a large Scotch on the rocks with my 
12v frig which doesn't care if it's level or not.
Hey, who knows?
Jo Ann
On 18, Dec 2003, at 8:08 AM, Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer 
wrote:

> If you can't lift the spare, how are you going to lift the flat? Unless
> the flat has shredded the tire, its going to weigh within a fraction of
> a pound of what the spare weighs. Air isn't very heavy...
>
> Problems I can see with the tiny spare are: Finding a wheel with the
> proper bolt centers and center hole; the very limited lifetime of that
> tire, something like 50 miles; trailer loads often are considerably
> higher per tire (hence the much higher air pressure) than car tire 
> loads
> so that little tire will last even less well, if it can even hold the
> load up; The smaller wheel and tire will compromise ground clearance 
> and
> tilt the refrigerator.
>
> Now convince me the little spare is a good idea. Read its load rating.
>
> Gerald J.
> -- 
> Entire content copyright Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer.
> Reproduction by permission only.
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> When replying to a message. please delete all unnecessary original text
>
> To unsubscribe or change to a digest format, please go to
> http://www.tompatterson.com/VAC/VAList/listoffice.html

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 20:12:04 -0800
From: Joann Wheatley <jwheatle@xxxxxxxxxx.edu>
Subject: [VAL] One for the Good Guys

I needed a very small sink for the bath in the rebuild of the Bubble 
and looked everywhere I could think of - none were quite right - too 
much incursion into the small space of the tiny bath. Then it hit me - 
off to the restaurant supply shop where for $13 + change I bought a 
"1/3 size steam table tray that was 18/8 Stainless Steel, 12" x 6 3/4" 
x 6" - just right, protruding only 6+ inches into the bath area. The 
least expensive "real sink" was $150 - 300. So the lesson is - think 
way, way outside the box and read this list postings.
Jo Ann

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 20:30:54 -0800
From: "Oliver Filippi" <ofilippi@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] One for the Good Guys

Joann,

BRILLIANT !!

Oliver Filippi

- ----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Joann Wheatley" <jwheatle@xxxxxxxxxx.edu>

> I needed a very small sink for the bath in the rebuild of the Bubble 
> and looked everywhere I could think of - none were quite right - too 
> much incursion into the small space of the tiny bath. Then it hit me - 
> off to the restaurant supply shop where for $13 + change I bought a 
> "1/3 size steam table tray that was 18/8 Stainless Steel, 12" x 6 3/4" 
> x 6" - just right, protruding only 6+ inches into the bath area. The 
> least expensive "real sink" was $150 - 300. So the lesson is - think 
> way, way outside the box and read this list postings.
> Jo Ann

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 22:54:19 -0600
From: "Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer" <geraldj@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Sew-in drapery tabs

What is the size of those heads? My '68 Caravel needs heads about 7/32"
diameter by 1/8" high with a 1/8" diameter shank 1/8" long. The track is
small.

Gerald J.
- -- 
Entire content copyright Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer.
Reproduction by permission only.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 22:54:31 -0600
From: "Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer" <geraldj@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Forwarded message

My '68 manual says the 30' Sovereign weighs nearly 5000 pounds empty
with a 400 pound tongue weight. Add maybe 1500 pounds for provisions and
stuff. Probably raise the tongue weight to 600 pounds.

Then the tow vehicle needs a proper brake controller tuned to the
trailer load and the load equalizing hitch, probably with sway control.
And these are often demanded by state laws these days. When the tow
vehicle weighs less than the trailer, its easy for life to be exciting
on the road. Unnecessarily exciting. When the tow vehicle has a short
wheel base control is too often lost and then all can be lost, tow
vehicle, trailer, and lives.

A 3/4 ton pickup properly equipped with transmission cooler, brake
controller, and load equalizing hitch should handle the 30' Sovereign
adequately. A 1 ton is overkill. A 1/2 ton is a little puny for all
situations. It will do on the straight and level, but not all the world
is straight and level.

Gerald J.
- -- 
Entire content copyright Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer.
Reproduction by permission only.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 22:54:34 -0600
From: "Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer" <geraldj@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Re: bike racks

Jo Ann, considering that finding the right wheel and tire to fit the
Airstream can be a pain, dropping that flatted tire, seems foolish. It
could take a week to find the proper replacement, taking into account
the required offset, the bolt center, the hub center, and the load
rating. There are wheels that would fit the hub, but would make the tire
rub on the inside or outside of the wheel well. There are tires that
would fit the hub, but would be not strong enough for the load and so
cause rapid tire wear and a possible disaster by breaking into chunks
while on the road. Not all tires of the same size label will fit in the
wheel well. Odds are that nearest three tire dealers won't have a true
trailer tire that will fit in the wheel well.

May I suggest you add a piece of about 1 or 1-1/4" aluminum tubing to
your tool kit. Perhaps 3 or four feet long. Or thin wall electrical
conduit (galvanized steel). Use it as a lever through the center hole of
the wheel with flat tire to lift the flatted tire into the truck bed,
SUV rear, or car trunk. It can allow you to move a 50 pound tire
assembly as easily as it let me load a 100+ pound tractor tire into my
truck this summer. You put maybe a foot of the pipe through the center
hole and rest the end (say two or three inches from the end) on the edge
of the tailgate, and grasp the end of the pipe two or three feet out
from the tire and lift. Its not elegant, but it surely can beat hunting
all over creation for the proper wheel and tire (and paying out $100)
when the flatted one my be fixed for $12 at any tire place it its just a
puncture and hasn't flown apart. If it has flown apart then it will be
much lighter to load.

Gerald J.
- -- 
Entire content copyright Dr. Gerald N. Johnson, electrical engineer.
Reproduction by permission only.

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Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 23:02:06 -0600
From: schuetzen - RKBA! <chasm@xxxxxxxxxx.net>
Subject: Re: [VAL] Forwarded message

On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 21:16:13 -0600, "Tom Patterson" <tomp@xxxxxxxxxx.com>
wrote:

>
>I have pampered this trailer for 39 years and always  kept all
>maintenance up to snuff......always keeping it ready to take off with a
>couple of hours notice so I hope whoever  owns it next  keeps it  for
>many years of happy trailering.    I wish my health had not gone down
>hill and  that I could continue.   I will appreciate any finfo forarded
>to me   Pearl in SoCal

Pearl, brush her off and wait for a responsible person to make an offer.
chas
- --
Charles L Hamilton  -  Houston, TX   -   chasm@xxxxxxxxxx.net
Very best Wishes for Health and Prosperity to You and Yours
in the coming New Year.  Happy Holidays!
Owner of Cast Bullet and Black Powder elists   RKBA!

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 21:25:30 -0800 (PST)
From: John Leggett <pklhead2@xxxxxxxxxx.com>
Subject: [VAL] RE: Shower curtain glides

Stephanie-
Try Fabric Depot - 700 SE 122nd Avenue Portland, OR 97233 Phone:
503-252-9530 Fax: 503-252-9556 E-mail: info@xxxxxxxxxx.com - in Northeast Portland (off of 
Stark and I-205).  My wife swears by that store, and if they don't have the Kirsch glides, 
I'm sure they can get them.  I've also seen the Recmar glides at our local Camping World.
 
John Leggett
 
- ------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 09:35:33 -0800
From: "Stephanie Roberts" <stefrobrts@stephanies-mustang.com>
Subject: [VAL] RE: Shower curtain glides

Hi there! I haven't found the glides yet. Apparently sew-on-tabs are 
one of
the few items that you can't buy over the internet. At least I haven't 
found
them. I was going to go try checking out a fabric store next time I go 
into
town.

Stephanie
Battle Ground, WA
68 Caravel #3717





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End of VAL Digest V1 #101
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